PRINT VS. DIGITAL

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Many people love picking up their newspaper off their front step while others prefer the quick internet connection to unlimited resources. Our society is supported by computers and the information they contain. Books are becoming less used and the same goes for newspapers. Progress in schools, homes, and businesses require the use of digital media sources pushing away older printed texts and even today’s newspaper: The New York Times. If modern day society is falling into the online world, are printed sources such as books and newspapers truly needed? With the rise of online possibilities printed texts are becoming limited with information compared to the vast world of the web resulting in a lower need for printed texts.

With today’s modernizing society, newer generations are looking toward a faster and easier way to browse the media and news. Many news channels, newspapers, and companies resort to online advertisement to reach more viewers. Bill Keller, the New York Times Executive Editor, admitted that people are resorting to the online sites rather than the newspaper itself. “But the Web audience is growing at a great clip, while print circulation is not. And online revenues are growing faster, too, albeit from a smaller base. If the trend continues, there’s little doubt that — ‘eventually’ — online becomes the main business.” The older “technologically challenged” generations, are being consumed by the media-oriented, newer generations, converting books and newspapers to websites and .com’s. Facebook, Twittier, and other online sources dominate social, political, and economic news and are a faster and much easier way to update the public. The web has to expand with the growing web audience.

The New York Times has been published since 1851. One-hundred and fifty-nine years have been filled with the tradition of picking up a newspaper and reading articles that span over days, weeks, and months. The idea of communication through the newspaper connects us to the past and the unchanging feel of the newspaper itself. Although we do lose tradition, we gain a more open and opportune source of information through the internet. Technology, and its powers, gives us more room for improvement and advancement in society. Although the New York Times is being read by people across the United States, the newspaper distributers and readers themselves have been decreasing causing the news to transfer online.

Finding an article that was written On May 6, 1998, in the New York Styles section, would be nearly impossible with only printed newspapers while online sources can take you back years and find articles you never know even existed. The vast amount of information contained on a simple search browser is far more than the daily newspaper. While most revenue is made from printed newspapers, around $483,594,000, the online views are much greater the population reading the printed papers. Since ads are a major part of the New York Times revenue, advertisers have begun seeing more benefits to advertising online. A single ad in the New York Times paper costs around $157,122 and covers a four quarter page display. This ad shows up only once on one page and is skipped over by many readers. Putting an ad on the online version of the New York Times costs around $7,500 and is advertised on multiple pages . Clearly, the profit lies in the internet. Advertisers have been switching methods to communicate more with the expanding public.

Some enjoy ink stained fingers and others choose to type away at a keyboard and scroll down the page. Since the audience of the New York Times is shifting toward newer more modern generations, their “business center of gravity” needs to be shifted online to fit the technology-oriented viewers. Although a tradition is lost, a new tradition of online browsing is created to fit the expanding media.

 

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FINAL FINAL DRAFT:Textual Analysis: Sunday Styles New York Times

Business, stocks, and politics are potentially dry articles read mostly by the black-tie business men running to their corporate meetings. They spend some time flipping through the money articles and stressing over the stock rates. But where are the articles for the stay-at-home mom? The art major? Or the high school teenager?  Passing through the business section, are the Arts and leisure segments, the travel information, and the Sunday styles. The Sunday Styles contains information about fashion, trends, and social happenings.  It shows weekly weddings and contains ads advertising anything from shoes to shows.  The Sunday Styles is a place for the socially elite. It reaches out to the fashionable New Yorker who tries to avoid the business section while still maintaining the appearance of a sophisticated resident.

The Sunday styles contain a range of articles that have to be reviewed in different ways. While one describes the conflict in a republican-democratic marriage; another explains a new way to set up intellectual meetings. Ideas are swapped and the articles encompass a more personal underline. The Sunday style is not like People magazine or Us Weekly; it contains articles about pop-culture’s impact on social issues while keeping the professionalism of the New York Times. The writers, in these sections, focus on current and modern issues that both entertain and inform the reader. While some are just reviews of music or books there are articles on love, studies, and on-the-street fashion.

All the authors that put together the Sunday styles section have different ideas and purposes. On the front page there are articles communicating two different concepts with the readers. One article, by Stephanie Rosenbloom, describes the accomplishment of a network of social entrepreneurs coming up with ways to set up free TEDx discussions. She argue that social events are changing due to the new ideas sparked by ongoing progress with technology and expanding topics such as math curriculums, health care, and mastering the work-life balance. On the same page, an article by Sheryl Gay Stolberg explains the life of “Valerie Plame Wilson: a spy that went Hollywood.” “America’s best-known ex-spy, was looking chic in black bustier and flowing white pants, posing for the paparazzi on the red carpet…” (Red Carpet Spy). The author combines the C.I.A operative’s professional back ground and red carpet style to create a story more appealing with added gossip. These two, very differing, articles might be strange to look at in the same section but they both have the same purpose: the effect of social media on culture.  The writers, in this section, are mostly women that write with an emotional and personal style.  Toward the middle of the segment is a very interesting article that combines marriage and politics. In “Hand-Holding Across the Aisle” the author, Aimee Lee Ball, discusses relationship between a democratic woman and a republican man. She discusses how “politics make strange bedfellows” and how “in-laws may treat the newcomer as an alien life form” (Hand-Holding Across the Aisle). This “coexistence” brings in the political culture into the social culture mixing both personal and government-related topics. The differing articles combine under one theme: pop-culture and social influences.

This socially elite audience looks for something that will match their lifestyle. They are the business, they are the economy, and they are the style. They are on the level of the New York Times and treat it like it is their own personal journal. Who else would buy a pair of leopard boots for one thousand dollars besides the socially elite New Yorker? This is why this section is meant for them.  The articles do not communicate to the younger population because of the intertwined social and exclusive nature of this section. While most authors are more informative of the social events and happenings, a lot of them state their opinion in clothes and show personal opinions about social matters. The curious reader fills their interest with wedding information, dangerous new styles, and risqué fashion statements. Like the stocks to the business associates, the Style segment is for the wife of that wealthy business man.

While most New York Time readers are in the higher-class of major cities, there are those who skip over the intellectual articles to the sections meant for their personal interests. The Sunday Style section incorporates social issues and happenings with a more compassionate voice.  Set up with different ideas on different pages, this segment shows the week in news through a modern and social stand point. It sticks together various articles that explain economic, cultural, and political events and ideas through a modern perspective meant for the eyes of the socially exclusive reader. It covers topics from leopard print shoes to expanding entrepreneurs intensifying their ideas. This, all-encompassing, section truly shows another side of the very proper New York Times.

New York Times, Sunday Styles sec.: 1-18. 26 Sept. 2010. Web. 5 Oct. 2010

Aimee, Ball Lee. “Hand-Holding Across the Aisle.” New York Times, Sunday Styles sec. 26 Sept. 2010. Web. 5 Oct. 2010.

Sheryl, Stolberg Gay. “Red Carpet Spy.” New York Times. 24 Sept. 2010. Web. 5 Oct. 2010.

 

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Argument / Advocacy Project Proposal

Many people love picking up their newspaper off their front step in the morning while others prefer the quick internet connection to unlimited resources. In this paper I will argue why it is better to read a digital version of the New York Times over a printed version. Although the printed version is easier for the eyes and has more historical value, the printing business is being consumed by the online world.  I will discuss how the digital version of the New York Times is less expensive and has more options and space for information. Locating information online is faster and easier to find then in a thick newspaper. I will add the importance of a printed paper but will include how the digital version is more manageable and practical for today’s society. Our society is supported by computers and the information they contain. Books are becoming less used and the same goes for newspapers. Progress in schools, homes, and businesses require the use of digital media sources pushing away older printed text sources.

 

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Textual Analysis: Sunday Styles New York Times

Business, stocks, and politics are potentially dry articles read mostly by the black-tie business men running to their corporate meetings. They spend some time flipping through the money articles and stressing over the stock rates. But where are the articles for the stay-at-home mom? The art major? Or the high school teenager?  Passing through the business section, are the Arts and leisure segments, the travel information, and the Sunday styles. The Sunday Styles contains information about fashion, trends, and social happenings.  It shows weekly weddings and contains ads advertising anything from shoes to shows.  The Sunday Styles is a place for the socially elite. It reaches out to the fashionable New Yorker who tries to avoid the business section while still maintaining the appearance of a sophisticated resident.

The Sunday styles contain a range of articles that have to be reviewed in different ways. While one describes the conflict in a republican-democratic marriage; another explains a new way to set up intellectual meetings. Ideas are swapped and the articles encompass a more personal underline. The Sunday style is not like People magazine or Us Weekly; it contains articles about pop-culture’s impact on social issues while keeping the professionalism of the New York Times. The writers, in these sections, focus on current and modern issues that both entertain and inform the reader. While some are just reviews of music or books there are articles on love, studies, and on-the-street fashion.

All the authors that put together the Sunday styles section have different ideas and purposes. On the front page there are articles communicating two different concepts with the readers. One article, by Stephanie Rosenbloom, explains the accomplishment of a network of social entrepreneurs coming up with ways to set up free TEDx discussions. She discusses how social events are changing due to the new ideas sparked by ongoing progress with technology and expanding topics such as math curriculums, health care, and mastering the work-life balance. On the same page, an article by Sheryl Gay Stolberg explains the life of “Valerie Plame Wilson: a spy that went Hollywood.” “America’s best-known ex-spy, was looking chic in black bustier and flowing white pants, posing for the paparazzi on the red carpet…” (Red Carpet Spy). The author combines the C.I.A operative’s professional back ground and red carpet style to create a story more appealing with added gossip. These two, very differing, articles might be strange to look at in the same section but they both have the same purpose: the effect of social media on culture.  The writers, in this section, are mostly women that write with an emotional and personal style.  Toward the middle of the segment is a very interesting article that combines marriage and politics. In “Hand-Holding Across the Aisle” the author, Aimee Lee Ball, discusses relationship between a democratic woman and a republican man. She discusses how “politics make strange bedfellows” and how “in-laws may treat the newcomer as an alien life form” (Hand-Holding Across the Aisle). This “coexistence” brings in the political culture into the social culture mixing both personal and government-related topics. The differing articles combine under one theme: pop-culture and social influences.

This socially elite audience looks for something that will match their lifestyle. They are the business, they are the economy, and they are the style. They are on the level of the New York Times and treat it like it is their own personal journal. Who else would buy a pair of leopard boots for one thousand dollars besides the socially elite New Yorker? This is why this section is meant for them.  The articles do not communicate to the younger population because of the intertwined social and exclusive nature of this section. While most authors are more informative of the social events and happenings, a lot of them state their opinion in clothes and show personal opinions about social matters. The curious reader fills their interest with wedding information, dangerous new styles, and risqué fashion statements. Like the stocks to the business associates, the Style segment is for the wife of that wealthy business man.

While most New York Time readers are in the higher-class of major cities, there are those who skip over the intellectual articles to the sections meant for them. The Sunday Style section incorporates social issues and happenings with a more compassionate voice.  Set up with different ideas on different pages, this segment shows the week in news through a modern and social stand point. It sticks together various articles that explain economic, cultural, and political events and ideas through a modern perspective meant for the eyes of the socially exclusive reader. It covers topics from leopard print shoes to expanding entrepreneurs intensifying their ideas. This, all-encompassing, section truly shows another side of the very proper New York Times.

New York Times, Sunday Styles sec.: 1-18. 26 Sept. 2010. Web. 5 Oct. 2010

Aimee, Ball Lee. “Hand-Holding Across the Aisle.” New York Times, Sunday Styles sec. 26 Sept. 2010. Web. 5 Oct. 2010.

Sheryl, Stolberg Gay. “Red Carpet Spy.” New York Times. 24 Sept. 2010. Web. 5 Oct. 2010.

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Textual Analysis Rough Draft: Sunday Styles New York Times

Business, stocks, and politics are dry articles meant to be read by the black-tie business man running to his corporate meeting. He’ll spend some time flipping through the money articles and drooling over the stock rates. But where are the articles for the stay-at-home mom? The art major? Or the high school teenager?  Passing through the business section, are the Arts and leisure segments, the travel information, and the Sunday styles.  The Sunday styles contain information about fashion, trends, and social happenings.  It shows weekly weddings and contains ads advertising anything from shoes to shows.  Since The New York Times is a biased newspaper, it is hard to see how this would have any impact on the Sunday styles. Once one reaches the meat of the section, the bias can be seen with the progression of the articles. The changing view points and voices of the articles make this segment more open and less constricting.

The Sunday styles contain a range of articles that have to be reviewed in different ways. While one describes the conflict in a republican-democratic marriage; another explains a new way to set up intellectual meetings. Ideas are swapped and the articles contain a more personal underline. The Sunday styles is not like People magazine or Us Weekly; it contains articles about pop-culture’s impact on social issues in a conservative manner. The writers, in these sections, focus on current and modern issues that both entertain and inform the reader. While some are just reviews of music or books there are articles on love, studies, and on-the-street fashion.

All the authors that put together the Sunday styles section have different ideas and purposes. On the front page there are articles communicating two different concepts with the readers. One article, by Stephanie Rosenbloom, explains the accomplishment of a network of social entrepreneurs coming up with ways to set up free TEDx discussions. She discusses how social events are changing due to the new ideas sparked by ongoing progress with technology and expanding topis such as math curriculums, health care, and mastering the work-life balance. On the same page, an article by Sheryl Gay Stolberg explains the life of Valerie Plame Wilson: a spy that went Hollywood. These two, very differing articles, might be strange to look at in the same section but they both have the same purpose: the effect of social media.  The writers in this section are mostly women that write with an emotional and attached style.  Toward the middle of the section is a very interesting article that combines marriage and politics. In Hand-Holding Across the Aisle the author, Aimee Lee Ball, discusses relationship between a democratic woman and a republican man. This “coexistence” brings in the political culture into the social culture mixing both personal and government-related topics. The differing articles combine under one theme: pop-culture and social influences.

The Sunday Styles is a place for the socially elite. It reaches out to the fashionable New Yorker who tries to avoid the business section while still maintaining the appearance of a sophisticated resident. The articles do not communicate to the younger population because of the intertwined social and political information in the articles. The authors create a voice in their articles that can be bias. While most are more informative of the social event and happenings, a lot of the authors state their opinion indirectly toward small hints in their writing. This section is also for the curious and snoopy reader that looks through the wedding/celebration section. These wedding pages are for the people that like to be in other people’s business. Like the stocks to the business associates the Style segment is for the more culturally aware and interested.

While most New York Time readers are the higher-class business men, there are those who skip over the intellectual articles to the sections meant for them. The Sunday Style section incorporates social issues and happenings with a more compassionate voice.  Set up with different ideas on different pages, this segment shows the week in news through a modern and social stand point. It sticks together various articles that explain economic, cultural, and political events and ideas through a modern perspective. It covers topics from leopard print shoes to expanding entrepreneurs intensifying their ideas. This, all-encompassing, section truly shows another side of the very conservative New York Times.

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Rhetorical Precis 2

Cowen, Tyler. “Can the Fed Offer a Reason to Cheer?” The New York Times 19 Sept. 2010, Sunday ed., Business sec.: 5. Print.

“Can the Fed Offer A Reason to Cheer” discusses how our economy needs guidance to expand through the support of the people. The author, Tyler Cowen, argues that the United States needs to give people optimistic support so they believe and stay committed to increasing the rate of inflation. Cowen makes this argument by supporting the Federal Reserve’s idea of stimulated spending and reducing skepticism in the economy. In this argument, he states that the people themselves have to believe in the economy in order to inflate it. Cowen’s argument is directed to the tax-paying citizen and his purpose is to motivate that citizen into having more hope in the economy enabling it to expand.

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Rhetorical Precis

Morgenson, Gretchen. “Housing Doesn’t Need a Crash. It Needs Bold Ideas.” New York Times. 13 Sept. 2010. Web. 16 Sept. 2010.

Gretchen Morgenson argues that the government has failed in tackling the increasing problems with mortgages and real estate. Morgenson makes this argument by explaining the lack of support the treasury offers the housing program and the decreasing house market value. Morgenson makes this argument in order to inform the reader how to avoid losing their home and finding other ways to pay off their mortgages. Morgenson assumes that her readers are curious home owners that want to know what is happening to the market and what they can do to have a better chance surviving the economic crisis.

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